Typology

Southern’s journal is nice that they have a theme. And theme of their recent journal is typology Wellum’s opening remarks notes that Christian’s disagree about how to understand typology But he gives his own definition of typology and the contours that he thinks all the contributors are working with in. My question is whether typology is only a Christological reading? His definition seems to imply this. So my question is how it relates to narrative patterning.

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Theological Moorings for Canonical Readings

My doctoral supervisor, David Hogg, was once asked in my Theological Method PhD seminar what his method is. I still love his response: "I look for patterns and weird stuff." That is, his approach to reading Scripture consists largely of paying attention to what is repeated and what stands out as extraordinary, either in terms … Continue reading Theological Moorings for Canonical Readings

Earthy Signs of Israel’s Restoration

At the end of Hosea, God promises to restore Israel, and he declares his redemptive purposes using the earthy symbols of grain and vine: They shall return and dwell beneath my shadow;     they shall flourish like the grain; they shall blossom like the vine;     their fame shall be like the wine of Lebanon (Hos. 14:7). … Continue reading Earthy Signs of Israel’s Restoration

Saul and the Restoration of Israel

In the Old Testament, Israel becomes divided long before the United Monarchy splits. At the end of Judges (chs. 19-21), a Levite takes a Judahite concubine and spends the night with her in Gibeah, a city which belonged to Benjamin. In a horrifying echo of Sodom and Gomorrah, the men of Benjamin come to rape … Continue reading Saul and the Restoration of Israel

Cultural Liturgies and Scriptural Imagination

As I continue to work through Barry Harvey's Can These Bones Live?, I'm consistently reminded of Jamie Smith's "Cultural Liturgies" project. Both Harvey and Smith argue that the church's worship practices are formative for her people, both in their growth in Christ-likeness and in their witness to and mission in the world. The liturgical life … Continue reading Cultural Liturgies and Scriptural Imagination

Typology, TIS, and Biblical Theology

On Saturday Jim Hamilton contrasted the Theological Interpretation of Scripture movement's and biblical theology's understanding of typology. The gist of Hamilton's argument is that TIS focuses on the divine author's intent in understanding typological patterns and readings, whereas BT (or Hamilton's approach to it, anyway) focuses on the human author's intent. Patrick Schreiner responded this … Continue reading Typology, TIS, and Biblical Theology

Typology in Chronicles

I'm currently reading Scott Hahn's masterful work on Chronicles, The Kingdom of God as Liturgical Empire: A Theological Commentary on 1-2 Chronicles (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2012). Hahn so far has exhibited exegetical acumen (working both the MT and LXX), historical awareness, and theological brilliance. I realize this glowing description may seem to be so … Continue reading Typology in Chronicles

Storied Typology

Over at Euangelion, Joel Willitts has written a couple of posts on doing Biblical Theology. I think Joel's intuitions are correct that a typological approach tends to exalt "fulfilment" to the neglect of the "type." Willitts wants to show the meaning and the significance of the "new" is profoundly shaped by understanding the "old." He … Continue reading Storied Typology

Where in the NT are Joseph and Joshua?

A few weeks ago at Near Emmaus, Brian LePort asked an intriguing question: Why didn't the Apostle Paul cite the Book of Jonah? The question fueled some conversation but I'm not sure there was ever a definitive answer. Although I didn't weigh in on the discussion, I've been turning the question over in my mind … Continue reading Where in the NT are Joseph and Joshua?