Evangelicals and Historical Theology

For a few years now I've felt that evangelicals need to reevaluate our relationship with the Christian tradition. Some of this is related to my own experience with tradition, while other aspects of this impulse arise, I think, from seeing how evangelicals use the tradition in their own work, whether in service of their scholarship … Continue reading Evangelicals and Historical Theology

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20th Century Theology and Classical Christian Theism

About eighteen months ago, in the summer of 2016, Wayne Grudem and others were put on trial via blog about their views on the Trinity. Grudem holds to ERAS, or Eternal Relations of Authority and Submission, wherein God the Son eternally, functionally (not ontologically) submits to the Father. This submission in the Godhead, for him … Continue reading 20th Century Theology and Classical Christian Theism

Canonical Parameters for Talking about the Cry of Dereliction

Last week I posted about some dogmatic parameters for talking about the Cry of Dereliction. In this post I want to add to those parameters some boundaries given to us by the text of Scripture. Jesus' guttural utterance from the cross, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" (Mk. 15:34) ought to be … Continue reading Canonical Parameters for Talking about the Cry of Dereliction

The Anointing at Bethany

Today is Wednesday in Holy Week, a day traditionally used to commemorate Mary's anointing of Jesus at Bethany (John 12:1-8). Mary's act of breaking the alabaster jar and pouring the ointment on Jesus' feet is "wasteful" and "useless," to use Malcolm Guite's description, and Judas chastises Mary for exactly that. But, as Guite goes on … Continue reading The Anointing at Bethany

Parameters for Talking about the the Cry of Dereliction

It's Holy Week, which means most Christians have their hearts turned toward Golgotha. There is so much confusion about one biblical passage that describes the crucifixion - the cry of dereliction, Jesus' quotation of Psalm 22:1 from the cross. When we ask what it means for Jesus to say, "My God, my God, why have … Continue reading Parameters for Talking about the the Cry of Dereliction

Early Christian Interpretation and Classical Christian Theism

I don't think it's an overstatement to say that there were quite a few major movements in twentieth century theology, from a variety of theological streams, that concerned themselves with overturning or significantly revising classical Christian theism (CCT). Influences as varied as biblical theology, apologetics, philosophy, church history, and the history of interpretation have contributed … Continue reading Early Christian Interpretation and Classical Christian Theism

Four Myths About Christ’s Descent to the Dead

The doctrine of Christ’s descent to the dead, expressed by the clause “He descended to the dead” in the Apostles’ Creed, might be one of the most unpopular doctrines in evangelical churches today. I haven’t done a scientific poll to support that, but I’m pretty sure if I took one the descent would be down … Continue reading Four Myths About Christ’s Descent to the Dead

The “Scripture and…” Seminars in Boston

I say it every year, and I mean it every year - my favorite events of IBR/SBL are the Scripture and Hermeneutics, Scripture and Doctrine, and Scripture and Church Seminars. These seminars attempt to combine rigorous biblical study and philosophical and theological reflection in an ecclesial context. This year, the SAHS and SADS seminars will … Continue reading The “Scripture and…” Seminars in Boston

Welcoming Brandon Smith to Biblical Reasoning

On behalf of the two Luke's (both of whom, oddly enough, are technically "Lucas"...), I'd like to welcome my friend Brandon Smith to the blog. It's a shame he doesn't have a Gospel writer somewhere in his name. Oh well. Brandon is moving his blogging efforts here after spending a number of years writing elsewhere, … Continue reading Welcoming Brandon Smith to Biblical Reasoning

Arguing from Silence in the Early Church

This summer Luke Stamps and I had a relatively brief interaction about penal substitution and its catholicity. One of the common objections to penal substitution is that it is not found in the early church’s theological reflection. While we gave some brief examples in our posts of where it might be found, at least implicitly, … Continue reading Arguing from Silence in the Early Church