The “Scripture and…” Seminars in Boston

I say it every year, and I mean it every year - my favorite events of IBR/SBL are the Scripture and Hermeneutics, Scripture and Doctrine, and Scripture and Church Seminars. These seminars attempt to combine rigorous biblical study and philosophical and theological reflection in an ecclesial context. This year, the SAHS and SADS seminars will … Continue reading The “Scripture and…” Seminars in Boston

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Welcoming Brandon Smith to Biblical Reasoning

On behalf of the two Luke's (both of whom, oddly enough, are technically "Lucas"...), I'd like to welcome my friend Brandon Smith to the blog. It's a shame he doesn't have a Gospel writer somewhere in his name. Oh well. Brandon is moving his blogging efforts here after spending a number of years writing elsewhere, … Continue reading Welcoming Brandon Smith to Biblical Reasoning

Arguing from Silence in the Early Church

This summer Luke Stamps and I had a relatively brief interaction about penal substitution and its catholicity. One of the common objections to penal substitution is that it is not found in the early church’s theological reflection. While we gave some brief examples in our posts of where it might be found, at least implicitly, … Continue reading Arguing from Silence in the Early Church

Sexual Identity and Theological Anthropology

In their recently released Christian Dogmatics: An Introduction (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2017), Cornelis van der Kooi and Gijsbert van den Brink offer a view of biological sex and sexuality grounded in theological anthropology. They focus particularly on the connection between sex and the relational aspect of the imago dei, and do so in order to … Continue reading Sexual Identity and Theological Anthropology

Is Nicaea Enough?

A sentiment with which I sympathize and which I hear often is that "Nicaea is enough." By this people seem to mean that, when trying to articulate boundaries for orthodoxy and, thus, for who is and who isn't a Christian, the Nicene Creed, or more often the Apostles' Creed, serves as the arbiter. In this … Continue reading Is Nicaea Enough?

Canonical Hermeneutics and Systemic Injustices

I watched the #PhilandoCastile dash cam video about an hour ago and am still horrified. This case appears to me to be a miscarriage of justice on every level, from the 50ish stops in 14 years to which Castile was subjected, to the actions of the officer, to the acquittal of the officer by the … Continue reading Canonical Hermeneutics and Systemic Injustices

David Foster Wallace on Turgidity

I was encouraged and exhorted yesterday by Fred Sander's post on writing tips. Last night I also read a few essays in David Foster Wallace's Consider the Lobster, including his review of John Updike's Toward the End of Time ("Certainly the End of Something or Other, One Would Sort of Have to Think," pp. 51-58 … Continue reading David Foster Wallace on Turgidity

Combating Creedal Amputations of the Descent Clause

Tomorrow is Holy Saturday, that liminal temporal space between Good Friday and Easter Sunday. For many evangelicals, Holy Saturday has lost all meaning, while for others it is associated with Catholic and Orthodox notions of the Harrowing of Hell. Because of this latter association, where Christ goes into Hades (Hell) and brings out either virtuous … Continue reading Combating Creedal Amputations of the Descent Clause

Craig Bartholomew and the Kuyperian Tradition

IVP Academic will soon (April 24th) publish a new volume on retrieving the Kuyperian tradition by Craig Bartholomew, H. Evan Professor of Philosophy and Religion & Theology at Redeemer University College. Contours of the Kuyperian Tradition: A Systematic Introduction aims to identify "the key themes and ideas that define this tradition, including worldview, sphere sovereignty, … Continue reading Craig Bartholomew and the Kuyperian Tradition

Theological Moorings for Canonical Readings

My doctoral supervisor, David Hogg, was once asked in my Theological Method PhD seminar what his method is. I still love his response: "I look for patterns and weird stuff." That is, his approach to reading Scripture consists largely of paying attention to what is repeated and what stands out as extraordinary, either in terms … Continue reading Theological Moorings for Canonical Readings