Gregory of Nyssa on Eternal Relations of Origin

As the early church began to formulate its language about the Trinity, they needed to explain how we can say that there is one God in three Persons and how those Persons relate within the Godhead. In order to fight against heresies like Arianism, the orthodox Christians established that there are eternal relations of origin: … Continue reading Gregory of Nyssa on Eternal Relations of Origin

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Book Notice: Trinitarian Theology

On Monday, October 1, B&H Academic will release Trinitarian Theology: Theological Models and Trinitarian Application, edited by Keith Whitfield (Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary). This the first volume in the B&H Theological Review series, a series based on topics discussed at the annual B&H SBC Professors' Fellowship at ETS. In the book, Bruce Ware (The Southern … Continue reading Book Notice: Trinitarian Theology

Harassed and Helpless

I’ve been reading Matthew’s gospel recently, and one of the things that has stood out to me on this reading is Jesus’ compassion for people oppressed by sin. We often think about sin only in terms of our agency, that is, sin is something we do and are responsible for. Jesus certainly doesn’t diminish that … Continue reading Harassed and Helpless

Origen: Athanasian or Arian?

It is obligatory to note upfront that Origen was and is a controversial figure. The debate over accepting his views as orthodox or useful is ongoing, including the veracity of the number of times he was anathematized, whether or not he actually taught some of the doctrines he was accused of teaching, the extent to … Continue reading Origen: Athanasian or Arian?

Theological Wisdom

I've unintentionally but consistently been thinking and blogging about theological virtues the past few days. It occurred to me just now that the summation of what I've been trying to describe, whether it's in relation to reading a source accurately, or to loving those with whom we disagree, or to refraining from pugilism in our … Continue reading Theological Wisdom

“Not a Brawler”: Polemics v. Pugilism in Theology

Polemics - defined by Merriam-Webster as, alternatively, " an aggressive attack on or refutation of the opinions or principles of another," or, "the art or practice of disputation or controversy . . ."   - is sometimes required in theology. There have been, since the Garden, theological opinions that deserve strong rebuke. When required, we … Continue reading “Not a Brawler”: Polemics v. Pugilism in Theology

Evangelicals and Historical Theology

For a few years now I've felt that evangelicals need to reevaluate our relationship with the Christian tradition. Some of this is related to my own experience with tradition, while other aspects of this impulse arise, I think, from seeing how evangelicals use the tradition in their own work, whether in service of their scholarship … Continue reading Evangelicals and Historical Theology

Hendrikus Berkhof on the Old Testament as a Source of Christian Theology

By recognizing this book as  a source of revelation, the Christian church professes its belief that God pursues a unique course through history, and that the appearance of Jesus Christ was not an isolated epiphany but a decisive phase on a way which had begun ages ago, a way which took the shape of an … Continue reading Hendrikus Berkhof on the Old Testament as a Source of Christian Theology

Responding to Critiques of Inerrancy

In Can We Still Believe the Bible?, Craig Blomberg offers some observations on critiques of inerrancy and the idea that inerrancy “dies the death of a thousand qualifications” (pp. 126-130). He first employs Paul Feinberg’s definition: “Inerrancy means that when all facts are known, the Scriptures in their original autographs and properly interpreted will be … Continue reading Responding to Critiques of Inerrancy