Maximus on the Mystical Knowledge of God in Christ

I have recently been reading St. Maximus the Confessor’s commentary on the Lord’s Prayer, and it, like all of Maximus’ writings, rewards careful (and prayerful) reflection. If you don’t know about Maximus, I’m not talking about this guy (but he was pretty awesome too). Maximus was a seventh century Byzantine monk, theologian, and controversialist. He … Continue reading Maximus on the Mystical Knowledge of God in Christ

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The Trinity Debate: A Year of Reflections

Last summer, the evangelical Internet was ablaze with debates over the Trinity. The question at hand was, basically, whether or not the Son was subordinate or somehow under the Father’s authority before the Incarnation. No one denies that Jesus submitted to the Father’s will after the Incarnation, as biblical texts are rather clear on this (Matt. 26:39; John … Continue reading The Trinity Debate: A Year of Reflections

The “Scripture and…” Seminars in Boston

I say it every year, and I mean it every year - my favorite events of IBR/SBL are the Scripture and Hermeneutics, Scripture and Doctrine, and Scripture and Church Seminars. These seminars attempt to combine rigorous biblical study and philosophical and theological reflection in an ecclesial context. This year, the SAHS and SADS seminars will … Continue reading The “Scripture and…” Seminars in Boston

Basics for Interpreting the Book of Revelation

I didn’t grow up a Christian, but as soon as I began following Christ and attending a local church, I was almost immediately introduced to the Book of Revelation via the movie Left Behind. Like most Southern Baptist churches in the 90s, we talked a lot about the rapture, the Antichrist, the Tribulation, and miscellaneous … Continue reading Basics for Interpreting the Book of Revelation

Welcoming Brandon Smith to Biblical Reasoning

On behalf of the two Luke's (both of whom, oddly enough, are technically "Lucas"...), I'd like to welcome my friend Brandon Smith to the blog. It's a shame he doesn't have a Gospel writer somewhere in his name. Oh well. Brandon is moving his blogging efforts here after spending a number of years writing elsewhere, … Continue reading Welcoming Brandon Smith to Biblical Reasoning

Arguing from Silence in the Early Church

This summer Luke Stamps and I had a relatively brief interaction about penal substitution and its catholicity. One of the common objections to penal substitution is that it is not found in the early church’s theological reflection. While we gave some brief examples in our posts of where it might be found, at least implicitly, … Continue reading Arguing from Silence in the Early Church

Sexual Identity and Theological Anthropology

In their recently released Christian Dogmatics: An Introduction (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2017), Cornelis van der Kooi and Gijsbert van den Brink offer a view of biological sex and sexuality grounded in theological anthropology. They focus particularly on the connection between sex and the relational aspect of the imago dei, and do so in order to … Continue reading Sexual Identity and Theological Anthropology

Is Nicaea Enough?

A sentiment with which I sympathize and which I hear often is that "Nicaea is enough." By this people seem to mean that, when trying to articulate boundaries for orthodoxy and, thus, for who is and who isn't a Christian, the Nicene Creed, or more often the Apostles' Creed, serves as the arbiter. In this … Continue reading Is Nicaea Enough?

The Grammar of Messianism

I want to extend my congrats to my friend, Matt Novenson’s new book The Grammar of Messianism: An Ancient Jewish Political Idiom and Its Users (Oxford University Press, 2017). Matt is a Senior Lecturer at New College, University of Edinburgh and is a well respected Pauline and Christian Origins scholar. But more importantly (to me … Continue reading The Grammar of Messianism

Canonical Hermeneutics and Systemic Injustices

I watched the #PhilandoCastile dash cam video about an hour ago and am still horrified. This case appears to me to be a miscarriage of justice on every level, from the 50ish stops in 14 years to which Castile was subjected, to the actions of the officer, to the acquittal of the officer by the … Continue reading Canonical Hermeneutics and Systemic Injustices