My 5 Favorite Books of 2017​

It's become a somewhat annual tradition for me and many others to write a post like this. But people love books lists as they consider last-second Christmas gifts or are looking for ways to spend their Amazon gift cards. There are a few reasons why I’ve compiled this list. First, I love reading and I … Continue reading My 5 Favorite Books of 2017​

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Racism Is Hell on Earth

The recent scenes in Charlottesville, Shelbyville, and my hometown of Murfreesboro were examples of real-life, in-your-face hell on earth. As white supremacists marched down the streets with Confederate and Nazi flags, screaming racial slurs and hailing Hitler, we saw the antithesis of heaven’s demography: You are worthy to take the scroll and to open its … Continue reading Racism Is Hell on Earth

The Boundaries of ETS and the Task of Christian Scholarship

As this year's annual meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society (ETS) approaches, I want to return to an open letter to the members of ETS written by Stanley Gundry. In this letter, he expressed concern about the ramifications of a recent resolution affirming traditional marriage and the sexual binary of men and women. Commenting on … Continue reading The Boundaries of ETS and the Task of Christian Scholarship

Wesley Hill on Paul, the Trinity, and Theological Method

I interviewed Wesley Hill awhile back about his fantastic book, Paul and the Trinity. Hill's book is one of the best books I have read in years, and was the catalyst for my current Ph.D. dissertation. I posted it on my old blog, and am reposting the interview here because I think the Biblical Reasoning crowd … Continue reading Wesley Hill on Paul, the Trinity, and Theological Method

Maximus on the Mystical Knowledge of God in Christ

I have recently been reading St. Maximus the Confessor’s commentary on the Lord’s Prayer, and it, like all of Maximus’ writings, rewards careful (and prayerful) reflection. If you don’t know about Maximus, I’m not talking about this guy (but he was pretty awesome too). Maximus was a seventh century Byzantine monk, theologian, and controversialist. He … Continue reading Maximus on the Mystical Knowledge of God in Christ

The Trinity Debate: A Year of Reflections

Last summer, the evangelical Internet was ablaze with debates over the Trinity. The question at hand was, basically, whether or not the Son was subordinate or somehow under the Father’s authority before the Incarnation. No one denies that Jesus submitted to the Father’s will after the Incarnation, as biblical texts are rather clear on this (Matt. 26:39; John … Continue reading The Trinity Debate: A Year of Reflections

The “Scripture and…” Seminars in Boston

I say it every year, and I mean it every year - my favorite events of IBR/SBL are the Scripture and Hermeneutics, Scripture and Doctrine, and Scripture and Church Seminars. These seminars attempt to combine rigorous biblical study and philosophical and theological reflection in an ecclesial context. This year, the SAHS and SADS seminars will … Continue reading The “Scripture and…” Seminars in Boston

Basics for Interpreting the Book of Revelation

I didn’t grow up a Christian, but as soon as I began following Christ and attending a local church, I was almost immediately introduced to the Book of Revelation via the movie Left Behind. Like most Southern Baptist churches in the 90s, we talked a lot about the rapture, the Antichrist, the Tribulation, and miscellaneous … Continue reading Basics for Interpreting the Book of Revelation

Welcoming Brandon Smith to Biblical Reasoning

On behalf of the two Luke's (both of whom, oddly enough, are technically "Lucas"...), I'd like to welcome my friend Brandon Smith to the blog. It's a shame he doesn't have a Gospel writer somewhere in his name. Oh well. Brandon is moving his blogging efforts here after spending a number of years writing elsewhere, … Continue reading Welcoming Brandon Smith to Biblical Reasoning

Arguing from Silence in the Early Church

This summer Luke Stamps and I had a relatively brief interaction about penal substitution and its catholicity. One of the common objections to penal substitution is that it is not found in the early church’s theological reflection. While we gave some brief examples in our posts of where it might be found, at least implicitly, … Continue reading Arguing from Silence in the Early Church