The Anointing at Bethany

Today is Wednesday in Holy Week, a day traditionally used to commemorate Mary's anointing of Jesus at Bethany (John 12:1-8). Mary's act of breaking the alabaster jar and pouring the ointment on Jesus' feet is "wasteful" and "useless," to use Malcolm Guite's description, and Judas chastises Mary for exactly that. But, as Guite goes on … Continue reading The Anointing at Bethany

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Parameters for Talking about the the Cry of Dereliction

It's Holy Week, which means most Christians have their hearts turned toward Golgotha. There is so much confusion about one biblical passage that describes the crucifixion - the cry of dereliction, Jesus' quotation of Psalm 22:1 from the cross. When we ask what it means for Jesus to say, "My God, my God, why have … Continue reading Parameters for Talking about the the Cry of Dereliction

Like It or Not, God Is With You

This Lenten season I have been reading I Am with You, by Kathryn Greene-McCreight, which was the Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent book for 2016. It is a biblically rich and pastorally sensitive reflection on the presence of God with his people. This quote from Erasmus has really stuck with me over these past few weeks: Vocatus … Continue reading Like It or Not, God Is With You

The Holy Spirit as Love and Gift

In his fantastic new book, Engaging the Doctrine of the Holy Spirit, Matthew Levering argues that "the Holy Spirit should be praised and contemplated under proper names 'Love' and 'Gift,' with respect both to his intra-trinitarian identity and to his historical work in Jesus Christ and the church" (2). This idea is nothing new, as Levering … Continue reading The Holy Spirit as Love and Gift

Early Christian Interpretation and Classical Christian Theism

I don't think it's an overstatement to say that there were quite a few major movements in twentieth century theology, from a variety of theological streams, that concerned themselves with overturning or significantly revising classical Christian theism (CCT). Influences as varied as biblical theology, apologetics, philosophy, church history, and the history of interpretation have contributed … Continue reading Early Christian Interpretation and Classical Christian Theism

A Primer on Arius and His Heresy

Arius is a major figure in church history, and rightfully so—it was his theology that led to one of the most defining moments in the development of the doctrine of the Trinity. Largely thanks to Arius, the First Council of Nicaea in AD 325 was called to clarify his error about the divinity of the … Continue reading A Primer on Arius and His Heresy

Four Myths About Christ’s Descent to the Dead

The doctrine of Christ’s descent to the dead, expressed by the clause “He descended to the dead” in the Apostles’ Creed, might be one of the most unpopular doctrines in evangelical churches today. I haven’t done a scientific poll to support that, but I’m pretty sure if I took one the descent would be down … Continue reading Four Myths About Christ’s Descent to the Dead

Writing Slow in Order to Think Deep

When I tell people that I prefer to write by hand rather than type on a screen, they typically look at me like I’m a dinosaur. But I protest that I prefer to write by hand because it allows my mind and hand to work at the same speed since I can type faster than … Continue reading Writing Slow in Order to Think Deep

Where Are All the Patristics Scholars in Evangelicalism?

During my graduate work at Criswell College, I was fortunate to have a systematic theology professor who had studied patristic theology in his doctoral work, and a patristic theology professor who majored in the discipline and wrote his (now published) dissertation on early Christian exegesis and Irenaeus. I was more spoiled at the time than … Continue reading Where Are All the Patristics Scholars in Evangelicalism?

When God the Son Became Like Us

Perhaps the most beautiful hymn in Scripture is not found in the Psalms, but in Paul’s letter to the Philippians: Adopt the same attitude as that of Christ Jesus, who, existing in the form of God, did not consider equality with God as something to be exploited. Instead he emptied himself by assuming the form of a servant, taking … Continue reading When God the Son Became Like Us