Are Evangelicals Too Soft on Modern-Day Heterodoxy?

Andy Stanley’s Marcion-like (or maybe hyper-dispensational?) view of the OT has resurfaced and the outcry has already been well worn. This is nothing new for Stanley—it has been a trend of his for years (and years). However, I don’t want to address him specifically here. The defense of his teachings from some corners of evangelicalism … Continue reading Are Evangelicals Too Soft on Modern-Day Heterodoxy?

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God’s Kingdom from Genesis to Revelation

The biblical definition of "kingdom" has long been debated. A classic evangelical view taught to me in grad school was George Eldon Ladd's: the kingdom is God's sovereign rule. Others have pushed a more social kingdom, arguing that God's kingdom exists anywhere that social justice is being practiced. Of course, both of these definitions represent … Continue reading God’s Kingdom from Genesis to Revelation

Qohelet’s Advice on How Not to Hate Your Work as an Old Testament Scholar

Eric Ortlund: As a seminary professor with an incurably bookish bent, I personally find it deeply liberating to disconnect the value of my teaching and writing from visible results. It is a relief to me to admit that I cannot produce the results I want in my students; that is God’s work. With regard to … Continue reading Qohelet’s Advice on How Not to Hate Your Work as an Old Testament Scholar

The Trinity Debate (2016-2017): A Selected Bibliography

The 2016-2017 Trinity debate over the eternal submission of the Son was covered thoroughly by this blog, other blogs, Christianity Today, podcasts, a panel at ETS, and most certainly in every theological group text in evangelicalism. In an attempt to try and boil the debate down for those who want to read up, reflect, or … Continue reading The Trinity Debate (2016-2017): A Selected Bibliography

Like Father, Like Son? Christoph Barth’s OT Theology

Christoph Barth (1917-1986), son of the renowned Karl and brother of the relatively well-known Markus, is the lesser-known Barth of the family. A respected scholar in his own right, he spent much of his time teaching in Indonesia and published much less than the father and brother. His most popular and important work is his Old … Continue reading Like Father, Like Son? Christoph Barth’s OT Theology

John the Seer vs. Caesar

While compiling notes for my dissertation on the Book of Revelation, I came across this note on Revelation 1:16 in Craig Koester’s Revelation commentary: The section climaxes by noting that [Jesus] holds seven stars in his right hand (Rev 1:16). This cosmic imagery conveys sovereignty. An analogy appears on a coin from Domitian’s reign that depicts … Continue reading John the Seer vs. Caesar

20th Century Theology and Classical Christian Theism

About eighteen months ago, in the summer of 2016, Wayne Grudem and others were put on trial via blog about their views on the Trinity. Grudem holds to ERAS, or Eternal Relations of Authority and Submission, wherein God the Son eternally, functionally (not ontologically) submits to the Father. This submission in the Godhead, for him … Continue reading 20th Century Theology and Classical Christian Theism

Canonical Parameters for Talking about the Cry of Dereliction

Last week I posted about some dogmatic parameters for talking about the Cry of Dereliction. In this post I want to add to those parameters some boundaries given to us by the text of Scripture. Jesus' guttural utterance from the cross, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" (Mk. 15:34) ought to be … Continue reading Canonical Parameters for Talking about the Cry of Dereliction

The Anointing at Bethany

Today is Wednesday in Holy Week, a day traditionally used to commemorate Mary's anointing of Jesus at Bethany (John 12:1-8). Mary's act of breaking the alabaster jar and pouring the ointment on Jesus' feet is "wasteful" and "useless," to use Malcolm Guite's description, and Judas chastises Mary for exactly that. But, as Guite goes on … Continue reading The Anointing at Bethany