Sexual Identity and Theological Anthropology

In their recently released Christian Dogmatics: An Introduction (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2017), Cornelis van der Kooi and Gijsbert van den Brink offer a view of biological sex and sexuality grounded in theological anthropology. They focus particularly on the connection between sex and the relational aspect of the imago dei, and do so in order to … Continue reading Sexual Identity and Theological Anthropology

Advertisements

Is Nicaea Enough?

A sentiment with which I sympathize and which I hear often is that "Nicaea is enough." By this people seem to mean that, when trying to articulate boundaries for orthodoxy and, thus, for who is and who isn't a Christian, the Nicene Creed, or more often the Apostles' Creed, serves as the arbiter. In this … Continue reading Is Nicaea Enough?

The Grammar of Messianism

I want to extend my congrats to my friend, Matt Novenson’s new book The Grammar of Messianism: An Ancient Jewish Political Idiom and Its Users (Oxford University Press, 2017). Matt is a Senior Lecturer at New College, University of Edinburgh and is a well respected Pauline and Christian Origins scholar. But more importantly (to me … Continue reading The Grammar of Messianism

Canonical Hermeneutics and Systemic Injustices

I watched the #PhilandoCastile dash cam video about an hour ago and am still horrified. This case appears to me to be a miscarriage of justice on every level, from the 50ish stops in 14 years to which Castile was subjected, to the actions of the officer, to the acquittal of the officer by the … Continue reading Canonical Hermeneutics and Systemic Injustices

The Pattern of Sound Words: Some Brief Thoughts on the Semantics of Orthodoxy

One of the reasons why I believe the consensual tradition of Christian orthodoxy deserves so much deference is that its theological language has been time-tested. It has been tested in the laboratory of Christian history and Christian experience. It has passed through the crucible of ecclesiastical conflict and has been vindicated by lay Christian consensus … Continue reading The Pattern of Sound Words: Some Brief Thoughts on the Semantics of Orthodoxy

Typology

Southern’s journal is nice that they have a theme. And theme of their recent journal is typology Wellum’s opening remarks notes that Christian’s disagree about how to understand typology But he gives his own definition of typology and the contours that he thinks all the contributors are working with in. My question is whether typology is only a Christological reading? His definition seems to imply this. So my question is how it relates to narrative patterning.

A Book Review on Eugene Merrill’s 1–2 Chronicles Commentary

I’m a bit late in posting this (actually very late). But I thought some might be interested in reading my recent book review of Eugene Merrill’s commentary on 1–2 Chronicles that was published in the latest Themelios journal. Especially helpful are discussions on three theological themes in a redemptive-historical framework that are central to the … Continue reading A Book Review on Eugene Merrill’s 1–2 Chronicles Commentary

David Foster Wallace on Turgidity

I was encouraged and exhorted yesterday by Fred Sander's post on writing tips. Last night I also read a few essays in David Foster Wallace's Consider the Lobster, including his review of John Updike's Toward the End of Time ("Certainly the End of Something or Other, One Would Sort of Have to Think," pp. 51-58 … Continue reading David Foster Wallace on Turgidity

Combating Creedal Amputations of the Descent Clause

Tomorrow is Holy Saturday, that liminal temporal space between Good Friday and Easter Sunday. For many evangelicals, Holy Saturday has lost all meaning, while for others it is associated with Catholic and Orthodox notions of the Harrowing of Hell. Because of this latter association, where Christ goes into Hades (Hell) and brings out either virtuous … Continue reading Combating Creedal Amputations of the Descent Clause

A Biblical Theology of Resurrection in an early Christian Burial

My wife, Aubree, and I recently had a chance to get away for a few days to visit Rome—the Eternal City. It was a great visit and Rome truly is one of the greatest cities, if not the greatest. We spent a few days doing the normal tourist things like finding pizza and gelato. One … Continue reading A Biblical Theology of Resurrection in an early Christian Burial