The Pattern of Sound Words: Some Brief Thoughts on the Semantics of Orthodoxy

One of the reasons why I believe the consensual tradition of Christian orthodoxy deserves so much deference is that its theological language has been time-tested. It has been tested in the laboratory of Christian history and Christian experience. It has passed through the crucible of ecclesiastical conflict and has been vindicated by lay Christian consensus … Continue reading The Pattern of Sound Words: Some Brief Thoughts on the Semantics of Orthodoxy

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Typology

Southern’s journal is nice that they have a theme. And theme of their recent journal is typology Wellum’s opening remarks notes that Christian’s disagree about how to understand typology But he gives his own definition of typology and the contours that he thinks all the contributors are working with in. My question is whether typology is only a Christological reading? His definition seems to imply this. So my question is how it relates to narrative patterning.

A Book Review on Eugene Merrill’s 1–2 Chronicles Commentary

I’m a bit late in posting this (actually very late). But I thought some might be interested in reading my recent book review of Eugene Merrill’s commentary on 1–2 Chronicles that was published in the latest Themelios journal. Especially helpful are discussions on three theological themes in a redemptive-historical framework that are central to the … Continue reading A Book Review on Eugene Merrill’s 1–2 Chronicles Commentary

David Foster Wallace on Turgidity

I was encouraged and exhorted yesterday by Fred Sander's post on writing tips. Last night I also read a few essays in David Foster Wallace's Consider the Lobster, including his review of John Updike's Toward the End of Time ("Certainly the End of Something or Other, One Would Sort of Have to Think," pp. 51-58 … Continue reading David Foster Wallace on Turgidity

Combating Creedal Amputations of the Descent Clause

Tomorrow is Holy Saturday, that liminal temporal space between Good Friday and Easter Sunday. For many evangelicals, Holy Saturday has lost all meaning, while for others it is associated with Catholic and Orthodox notions of the Harrowing of Hell. Because of this latter association, where Christ goes into Hades (Hell) and brings out either virtuous … Continue reading Combating Creedal Amputations of the Descent Clause

A Biblical Theology of Resurrection in an early Christian Burial

My wife, Aubree, and I recently had a chance to get away for a few days to visit Rome—the Eternal City. It was a great visit and Rome truly is one of the greatest cities, if not the greatest. We spent a few days doing the normal tourist things like finding pizza and gelato. One … Continue reading A Biblical Theology of Resurrection in an early Christian Burial

If you were a Greek preposition, which one would you be?

Here is announcement that on 30 June-1 July 2017, Tyndale House in Cambridge is hosting a workshop on Greek prepositions. This workshop follows the highly successful conference on the Greek verb which resulted in an impressive volume from Lexham Press. The workshop will in particular be drawing from the resources of cognitive linguistic approaches to lexicography. There is a … Continue reading If you were a Greek preposition, which one would you be?

Craig Bartholomew and the Kuyperian Tradition

IVP Academic will soon (April 24th) publish a new volume on retrieving the Kuyperian tradition by Craig Bartholomew, H. Evan Professor of Philosophy and Religion & Theology at Redeemer University College. Contours of the Kuyperian Tradition: A Systematic Introduction aims to identify "the key themes and ideas that define this tradition, including worldview, sphere sovereignty, … Continue reading Craig Bartholomew and the Kuyperian Tradition

Theological Moorings for Canonical Readings

My doctoral supervisor, David Hogg, was once asked in my Theological Method PhD seminar what his method is. I still love his response: "I look for patterns and weird stuff." That is, his approach to reading Scripture consists largely of paying attention to what is repeated and what stands out as extraordinary, either in terms … Continue reading Theological Moorings for Canonical Readings

Earthy Signs of Israel’s Restoration

At the end of Hosea, God promises to restore Israel, and he declares his redemptive purposes using the earthy symbols of grain and vine: They shall return and dwell beneath my shadow;     they shall flourish like the grain; they shall blossom like the vine;     their fame shall be like the wine of Lebanon (Hos. 14:7). … Continue reading Earthy Signs of Israel’s Restoration