Canonical Hermeneutics and Systemic Injustices

I watched the #PhilandoCastile dash cam video about an hour ago and am still horrified. This case appears to me to be a miscarriage of justice on every level, from the 50ish stops in 14 years to which Castile was subjected, to the actions of the officer, to the acquittal of the officer by the … Continue reading Canonical Hermeneutics and Systemic Injustices

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A Biblical Theology of Resurrection in an early Christian Burial

My wife, Aubree, and I recently had a chance to get away for a few days to visit Romeā€”the Eternal City. It was a great visit and Rome truly is one of the greatest cities, if not the greatest. We spent a few days doing the normal tourist things like finding pizza and gelato. One … Continue reading A Biblical Theology of Resurrection in an early Christian Burial

Baptist Theological Method

Over the last day or so I've read Richard Barcellos' The Lord's Supper as a Means of Grace: More Than a Memory (Fearn: Mentor, 2013). I highly recommend this short but pastoral, exegetically based, and historically informed study of the church's communion practice from a Baptist perspective. Although I could highlight a number of quotes … Continue reading Baptist Theological Method

Intertextuality in Revelation

Today on Twitter (and by today I mean 2 minutes ago) I mentioned that I think there is much work to be done on intertextuality between Revelation and the rest of the New Testament. Because of John's obvious reliance on the Old Testament, there have been an increasing number of articles and books published on … Continue reading Intertextuality in Revelation

Typology, TIS, and Biblical Theology

On Saturday Jim Hamilton contrasted the Theological Interpretation of Scripture movement's and biblical theology's understanding of typology. The gist of Hamilton's argument is that TIS focuses on the divine author's intent in understanding typological patterns and readings, whereas BT (or Hamilton's approach to it, anyway) focuses on the human author's intent. Patrick Schreiner responded this … Continue reading Typology, TIS, and Biblical Theology

Scripture and Science

The relationship between science and Scripture is a hot topic today. I am of the opinion that, too often, Scripture is asked to accommodate to the positivist rationalistic assumptions and conclusions of modern scientific inquiry. Here are Vos' insightful words on the subject: "At present many writers take exception to [death entering the world through … Continue reading Scripture and Science

Francis Watson on the Biblical Story

. . . a book that begins with the assertion that 'In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth' establishes, through the comprehensiveness of its scope, the expectation that the narrative will lead eventually to an equally comprehensive goal - as indeed it does, in the creation of new heavens and a new … Continue reading Francis Watson on the Biblical Story

Storied Typology

Over at Euangelion, Joel Willitts has written a couple of posts on doing Biblical Theology. I think Joel's intuitions are correct that a typological approach tends to exalt "fulfilment" to the neglect of the "type." Willitts wants to show the meaning and the significance of the "new" is profoundly shaped by understanding the "old." He … Continue reading Storied Typology

Book Notice: The King in His Beauty

I could not be more excited about this book. Schreiner is an excellent biblical theologian, and *finally* we are seeing a bit more production in the area of whole Bible biblical theologies. I also am excited to see his organization of the book around God, his people, and the land. The volume is slated for … Continue reading Book Notice: The King in His Beauty

Goldsworthy on Biblical Theology

For my Biblical Interpretation class at CBU I am requiring Robert Plummer's 40 Questions About Interpreting the Bible and Graeme Goldsworthy's According to Plan. Although the latter book is technically (and subtitled) "an introduction to biblical theology," I am requiring it because, as Goldsworthy notes, "biblical theology is essential for hermeneutics" (25). In chapter one, … Continue reading Goldsworthy on Biblical Theology