Responding to Critiques of Inerrancy

In Can We Still Believe the Bible?, Craig Blomberg offers some observations on critiques of inerrancy and the idea that inerrancy “dies the death of a thousand qualifications” (pp. 126-130). He first employs Paul Feinberg’s definition: “Inerrancy means that when all facts are known, the Scriptures in their original autographs and properly interpreted will be … Continue reading Responding to Critiques of Inerrancy

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God’s Kingdom from Genesis to Revelation

The biblical definition of "kingdom" has long been debated. A classic evangelical view taught to me in grad school was George Eldon Ladd's: the kingdom is God's sovereign rule. Others have pushed a more social kingdom, arguing that God's kingdom exists anywhere that social justice is being practiced. Of course, both of these definitions represent … Continue reading God’s Kingdom from Genesis to Revelation

John the Seer vs. Caesar

While compiling notes for my dissertation on the Book of Revelation, I came across this note on Revelation 1:16 in Craig Koester’s Revelation commentary: The section climaxes by noting that [Jesus] holds seven stars in his right hand (Rev 1:16). This cosmic imagery conveys sovereignty. An analogy appears on a coin from Domitian’s reign that depicts … Continue reading John the Seer vs. Caesar

Canonical Hermeneutics and Systemic Injustices

I watched the #PhilandoCastile dash cam video about an hour ago and am still horrified. This case appears to me to be a miscarriage of justice on every level, from the 50ish stops in 14 years to which Castile was subjected, to the actions of the officer, to the acquittal of the officer by the … Continue reading Canonical Hermeneutics and Systemic Injustices

A Biblical Theology of Resurrection in an Early Christian Burial

My wife, Aubree, and I recently had a chance to get away for a few days to visit Rome—the Eternal City. It was a great visit and Rome truly is one of the greatest cities, if not the greatest. We spent a few days doing the normal tourist things like finding pizza and gelato. One … Continue reading A Biblical Theology of Resurrection in an Early Christian Burial

Baptist Theological Method

Over the last day or so I've read Richard Barcellos' The Lord's Supper as a Means of Grace: More Than a Memory (Fearn: Mentor, 2013). I highly recommend this short but pastoral, exegetically based, and historically informed study of the church's communion practice from a Baptist perspective. Although I could highlight a number of quotes … Continue reading Baptist Theological Method

Intertextuality in Revelation

Today on Twitter (and by today I mean 2 minutes ago) I mentioned that I think there is much work to be done on intertextuality between Revelation and the rest of the New Testament. Because of John's obvious reliance on the Old Testament, there have been an increasing number of articles and books published on … Continue reading Intertextuality in Revelation

Typology, TIS, and Biblical Theology

On Saturday Jim Hamilton contrasted the Theological Interpretation of Scripture movement's and biblical theology's understanding of typology. The gist of Hamilton's argument is that TIS focuses on the divine author's intent in understanding typological patterns and readings, whereas BT (or Hamilton's approach to it, anyway) focuses on the human author's intent. Patrick Schreiner responded this … Continue reading Typology, TIS, and Biblical Theology

Scripture and Science

The relationship between science and Scripture is a hot topic today. I am of the opinion that, too often, Scripture is asked to accommodate to the positivist rationalistic assumptions and conclusions of modern scientific inquiry. Here are Vos' insightful words on the subject: "At present many writers take exception to [death entering the world through … Continue reading Scripture and Science

Francis Watson on the Biblical Story

. . . a book that begins with the assertion that 'In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth' establishes, through the comprehensiveness of its scope, the expectation that the narrative will lead eventually to an equally comprehensive goal - as indeed it does, in the creation of new heavens and a new … Continue reading Francis Watson on the Biblical Story