Qohelet’s Advice on How Not to Hate Your Work as an Old Testament Scholar

Eric Ortlund: As a seminary professor with an incurably bookish bent, I personally find it deeply liberating to disconnect the value of my teaching and writing from visible results. It is a relief to me to admit that I cannot produce the results I want in my students; that is God’s work. With regard to … Continue reading Qohelet’s Advice on How Not to Hate Your Work as an Old Testament Scholar

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Biblical Reasoning on Twitter

A quick housekeeping note: though we've had a Facebook page for some time, we just created a Twitter account as well. Give us a follow to keep up with our latest posts and be reminded of others!

Like Father, Like Son? Christoph Barth’s OT Theology

Christoph Barth (1917-1986), son of the renowned Karl and brother of the relatively well-known Markus, is the lesser-known Barth of the family. A respected scholar in his own right, he spent much of his time teaching in Indonesia and published much less than the father and brother. His most popular and important work is his Old … Continue reading Like Father, Like Son? Christoph Barth’s OT Theology

Like It or Not, God Is With You

This Lenten season I have been reading I Am with You, by Kathryn Greene-McCreight, which was the Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent book for 2016. It is a biblically rich and pastorally sensitive reflection on the presence of God with his people. This quote from Erasmus has really stuck with me over these past few weeks: Vocatus … Continue reading Like It or Not, God Is With You

Writing Slow in Order to Think Deep

When I tell people that I prefer to write by hand rather than type on a screen, they typically look at me like I’m a dinosaur. But I protest that I prefer to write by hand because it allows my mind and hand to work at the same speed since I can type faster than … Continue reading Writing Slow in Order to Think Deep

Maximus on the Mystical Knowledge of God in Christ

I have recently been reading St. Maximus the Confessor’s commentary on the Lord’s Prayer, and it, like all of Maximus’ writings, rewards careful (and prayerful) reflection. If you don’t know about Maximus, I’m not talking about this guy (but he was pretty awesome too). Maximus was a seventh century Byzantine monk, theologian, and controversialist. He … Continue reading Maximus on the Mystical Knowledge of God in Christ

The “Scripture and…” Seminars in Boston

I say it every year, and I mean it every year - my favorite events of IBR/SBL are the Scripture and Hermeneutics, Scripture and Doctrine, and Scripture and Church Seminars. These seminars attempt to combine rigorous biblical study and philosophical and theological reflection in an ecclesial context. This year, the SAHS and SADS seminars will … Continue reading The “Scripture and…” Seminars in Boston

The Grammar of Messianism

I want to extend my congrats to my friend, Matt Novenson’s new book The Grammar of Messianism: An Ancient Jewish Political Idiom and Its Users (Oxford University Press, 2017). Matt is a Senior Lecturer at New College, University of Edinburgh and is a well respected Pauline and Christian Origins scholar. But more importantly (to me … Continue reading The Grammar of Messianism

David Foster Wallace on Turgidity

I was encouraged and exhorted yesterday by Fred Sander's post on writing tips. Last night I also read a few essays in David Foster Wallace's Consider the Lobster, including his review of John Updike's Toward the End of Time ("Certainly the End of Something or Other, One Would Sort of Have to Think," pp. 51-58 … Continue reading David Foster Wallace on Turgidity

Combating Creedal Amputations of the Descent Clause

Tomorrow is Holy Saturday, that liminal temporal space between Good Friday and Easter Sunday. For many evangelicals, Holy Saturday has lost all meaning, while for others it is associated with Catholic and Orthodox notions of the Harrowing of Hell. Because of this latter association, where Christ goes into Hades (Hell) and brings out either virtuous … Continue reading Combating Creedal Amputations of the Descent Clause