Wesley Hill on Paul, the Trinity, and Theological Method

I interviewed Wesley Hill awhile back about his fantastic book, Paul and the Trinity. Hill's book is one of the best books I have read in years, and was the catalyst for my current Ph.D. dissertation. I posted it on my old blog, and am reposting the interview here because I think the Biblical Reasoning crowd … Continue reading Wesley Hill on Paul, the Trinity, and Theological Method

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The “Scripture and…” Seminars in Boston

I say it every year, and I mean it every year - my favorite events of IBR/SBL are the Scripture and Hermeneutics, Scripture and Doctrine, and Scripture and Church Seminars. These seminars attempt to combine rigorous biblical study and philosophical and theological reflection in an ecclesial context. This year, the SAHS and SADS seminars will … Continue reading The “Scripture and…” Seminars in Boston

Basics for Interpreting the Book of Revelation

I didn’t grow up a Christian, but as soon as I began following Christ and attending a local church, I was almost immediately introduced to the Book of Revelation via the movie Left Behind. Like most Southern Baptist churches in the 90s, we talked a lot about the rapture, the Antichrist, the Tribulation, and miscellaneous … Continue reading Basics for Interpreting the Book of Revelation

Theological Moorings for Canonical Readings

My doctoral supervisor, David Hogg, was once asked in my Theological Method PhD seminar what his method is. I still love his response: "I look for patterns and weird stuff." That is, his approach to reading Scripture consists largely of paying attention to what is repeated and what stands out as extraordinary, either in terms … Continue reading Theological Moorings for Canonical Readings

Earthy Signs of Israel’s Restoration

At the end of Hosea, God promises to restore Israel, and he declares his redemptive purposes using the earthy symbols of grain and vine: They shall return and dwell beneath my shadow;     they shall flourish like the grain; they shall blossom like the vine;     their fame shall be like the wine of Lebanon (Hos. 14:7). … Continue reading Earthy Signs of Israel’s Restoration

Biblical Studies and Systematic Theology: An Allegory

This is anecdotal, and, for the purposes of this post, a bit hyperbolic, but in my experience there is still a divide within evangelical scholarship between biblical studies and systematic theology. To be sure, there are those who do these together and do it well, albeit from one or the other discipline, but, for many … Continue reading Biblical Studies and Systematic Theology: An Allegory

A Summarized Biblical Case for Eternal Generation

Some have asked that I summarize my earlier post defending eternal generation and arguing against ERAS, and do so by sticking primarily to exegetical and biblical theological arguments. I want to say at the outset that none of what I say below is without deep, deep roots in the historical tradition, nor is it my … Continue reading A Summarized Biblical Case for Eternal Generation

Historical Theology and Biblical Evidence in the Trinity Debate

I don't intend for this post to be long, just want to make a quick point about the relationship between historical theology and biblical evidence when we talk about the differing views of the Trinity. I've seen some comments on social media and blogs that go something like this: "While I can appreciate historical points … Continue reading Historical Theology and Biblical Evidence in the Trinity Debate

The Son’s Light and Biblical Understanding

I don't think it's any secret that I subscribe to an Augustinian understanding of how we approach and comprehend Holy Scripture's message to God's people. Commonly known as "faith seeking understanding" (from the Latin fides quarens intellectum), this view says that we come to the Bible and understand its message not as blank slates, without … Continue reading The Son’s Light and Biblical Understanding

Forgotten Saturday

I am knee deep in research for my LATC paper in January on the relationship between the burial of Jesus and eschatology. The day between Jesus' crucifixion and resurrection, or Holy Saturday, was until recently, in my experience and thought, relatively unimportant. Mark Davis' words capture my, and perhaps many Christians', view of this middle … Continue reading Forgotten Saturday