The Trinity Debate (2016-2017): A Selected Bibliography

The 2016-2017 Trinity debate over the eternal submission of the Son was covered thoroughly by this blog, other blogs, Christianity Today, podcasts, a panel at ETS, and most certainly in every theological group text in evangelicalism. In an attempt to try and boil the debate down for those who want to read up, reflect, or … Continue reading The Trinity Debate (2016-2017): A Selected Bibliography

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20th Century Theology and Classical Christian Theism

About eighteen months ago, in the summer of 2016, Wayne Grudem and others were put on trial via blog about their views on the Trinity. Grudem holds to ERAS, or Eternal Relations of Authority and Submission, wherein God the Son eternally, functionally (not ontologically) submits to the Father. This submission in the Godhead, for him … Continue reading 20th Century Theology and Classical Christian Theism

Early Christian Interpretation and Classical Christian Theism

I don't think it's an overstatement to say that there were quite a few major movements in twentieth century theology, from a variety of theological streams, that concerned themselves with overturning or significantly revising classical Christian theism (CCT). Influences as varied as biblical theology, apologetics, philosophy, church history, and the history of interpretation have contributed … Continue reading Early Christian Interpretation and Classical Christian Theism

When God the Son Became Like Us

Perhaps the most beautiful hymn in Scripture is not found in the Psalms, but in Paul’s letter to the Philippians: Adopt the same attitude as that of Christ Jesus, who, existing in the form of God, did not consider equality with God as something to be exploited. Instead he emptied himself by assuming the form of a servant, taking … Continue reading When God the Son Became Like Us

Eternal Generation and “Monogenēs”

The doctrine of eternal generation does not stand or fall with how one translates “monogenēs.” Although Lee Irons has helpfully argued that the term probably had the connotation of “only begotten” in the fourth century and in the NT, this only gets us so far regarding classic Trinitarianism. Evangelicals who previously cast doubts upon eternal … Continue reading Eternal Generation and “Monogenēs”

Alliterative Trinitarianism

Over the last month or so, I read back through Athanasius and the Cappadocians in preparation for ETS and for an essay on theological method and Trinitarian doctrine. As I've worked my way once again (perhaps the fourth time?) through these texts, an organizing scheme for part of their argument came to me . And … Continue reading Alliterative Trinitarianism

Rightly Dividing Trinitarian Grammar

Theologians have often used the term "grammar" to refer to the vocabulary necessary to speak correctly about one doctrine or another. This is especially true with respect to the doctrine of the Trinity; this most important, most studied, most clearly defined doctrine has been passed down to us using particular terms that have particular content … Continue reading Rightly Dividing Trinitarian Grammar

Gregory of Nyssa and a “Community of Wills”?

In Against Eunomius I.1.34 (NPNF 5), Gregory says this regarding the Father and Son sharing in one nature: So also the Father and Son are one, the community of nature and the community of will running, in them, into one. But if the Son had been joined in wish only to the Father, and divided … Continue reading Gregory of Nyssa and a “Community of Wills”?

Responding to Bruce Ware with Charitable Criticism

By Matt Emerson and Luke Stamps This past week, we were pleased to post two responses from Bruce Ware regarding some of the recent criticisms leveled against him and other proponents of eternal relations of authority and submission (ERAS). It should be obvious to anyone who has frequented this blog over the past month--since the first shots were … Continue reading Responding to Bruce Ware with Charitable Criticism

Some Clarifications from @kdclaunch on Bruce Ware and the Trinity Debate

Today we are pleased to share the following guest post from Kyle Claunch, who is currently pursuing a Ph.D. under the supervision of Bruce Ware at Southern Seminary. Kyle also contributed the essay "God is the Head of Christ: Does 1 Corinthians 11:3 Ground Gender Complementarianism in the Immanent Trinity" in the recent volume edited … Continue reading Some Clarifications from @kdclaunch on Bruce Ware and the Trinity Debate