God’s Kingdom from Genesis to Revelation

The biblical definition of "kingdom" has long been debated. A classic evangelical view taught to me in grad school was George Eldon Ladd's: the kingdom is God's sovereign rule. Others have pushed a more social kingdom, arguing that God's kingdom exists anywhere that social justice is being practiced. Of course, both of these definitions represent … Continue reading God’s Kingdom from Genesis to Revelation

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The Trinity Debate (2016-2017): A Selected Bibliography

The 2016-2017 Trinity debate over the eternal submission of the Son was covered thoroughly by this blog, other blogs, Christianity Today, podcasts, a panel at ETS, and most certainly in every theological group text in evangelicalism. In an attempt to try and boil the debate down for those who want to read up, reflect, or … Continue reading The Trinity Debate (2016-2017): A Selected Bibliography

John the Seer vs. Caesar

While compiling notes for my dissertation on the Book of Revelation, I came across this note on Revelation 1:16 in Craig Koester’s Revelation commentary: The section climaxes by noting that [Jesus] holds seven stars in his right hand (Rev 1:16). This cosmic imagery conveys sovereignty. An analogy appears on a coin from Domitian’s reign that depicts … Continue reading John the Seer vs. Caesar

20th Century Theology and Classical Christian Theism

About eighteen months ago, in the summer of 2016, Wayne Grudem and others were put on trial via blog about their views on the Trinity. Grudem holds to ERAS, or Eternal Relations of Authority and Submission, wherein God the Son eternally, functionally (not ontologically) submits to the Father. This submission in the Godhead, for him … Continue reading 20th Century Theology and Classical Christian Theism

Canonical Parameters for Talking about the Cry of Dereliction

Last week I posted about some dogmatic parameters for talking about the Cry of Dereliction. In this post I want to add to those parameters some boundaries given to us by the text of Scripture. Jesus' guttural utterance from the cross, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" (Mk. 15:34) ought to be … Continue reading Canonical Parameters for Talking about the Cry of Dereliction

Parameters for Talking about the the Cry of Dereliction

It's Holy Week, which means most Christians have their hearts turned toward Golgotha. There is so much confusion about one biblical passage that describes the crucifixion - the cry of dereliction, Jesus' quotation of Psalm 22:1 from the cross. When we ask what it means for Jesus to say, "My God, my God, why have … Continue reading Parameters for Talking about the the Cry of Dereliction

The Holy Spirit as Love and Gift

In his fantastic new book, Engaging the Doctrine of the Holy Spirit, Matthew Levering argues that "the Holy Spirit should be praised and contemplated under proper names 'Love' and 'Gift,' with respect both to his intra-trinitarian identity and to his historical work in Jesus Christ and the church" (2). This idea is nothing new, as Levering … Continue reading The Holy Spirit as Love and Gift

A Primer on Arius and His Heresy

Arius is a major figure in church history, and rightfully so—it was his theology that led to one of the most defining moments in the development of the doctrine of the Trinity. Largely thanks to Arius, the First Council of Nicaea in AD 325 was called to clarify his error about the divinity of the … Continue reading A Primer on Arius and His Heresy

Four Myths About Christ’s Descent to the Dead

The doctrine of Christ’s descent to the dead, expressed by the clause “He descended to the dead” in the Apostles’ Creed, might be one of the most unpopular doctrines in evangelical churches today. I haven’t done a scientific poll to support that, but I’m pretty sure if I took one the descent would be down … Continue reading Four Myths About Christ’s Descent to the Dead

When God the Son Became Like Us

Perhaps the most beautiful hymn in Scripture is not found in the Psalms, but in Paul’s letter to the Philippians: Adopt the same attitude as that of Christ Jesus, who, existing in the form of God, did not consider equality with God as something to be exploited. Instead he emptied himself by assuming the form of a servant, taking … Continue reading When God the Son Became Like Us