Are Evangelicals Too Soft on Modern-Day Heterodoxy?

Andy Stanley’s Marcion-like (or maybe hyper-dispensational?) view of the OT has resurfaced and the outcry has already been well worn. This is nothing new for Stanley—it has been a trend of his for years (and years). However, I don’t want to address him specifically here. The defense of his teachings from some corners of evangelicalism … Continue reading Are Evangelicals Too Soft on Modern-Day Heterodoxy?

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God’s Kingdom from Genesis to Revelation

The biblical definition of "kingdom" has long been debated. A classic evangelical view taught to me in grad school was George Eldon Ladd's: the kingdom is God's sovereign rule. Others have pushed a more social kingdom, arguing that God's kingdom exists anywhere that social justice is being practiced. Of course, both of these definitions represent … Continue reading God’s Kingdom from Genesis to Revelation

Canonical Parameters for Talking about the Cry of Dereliction

Last week I posted about some dogmatic parameters for talking about the Cry of Dereliction. In this post I want to add to those parameters some boundaries given to us by the text of Scripture. Jesus' guttural utterance from the cross, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" (Mk. 15:34) ought to be … Continue reading Canonical Parameters for Talking about the Cry of Dereliction

Stages of Development in Early Trinitarian Theology

The first chapter of my dissertation deals with the usefulness of Revelation for Trinitarian theology, with some of the major Church Fathers as part of my justification. So, over the past few weeks, I've been reading the early church's use of the Book of Revelation in their discussions on the divinity of the Father, Son, and … Continue reading Stages of Development in Early Trinitarian Theology

A Book Review on Eugene Merrill’s 1–2 Chronicles Commentary

I’m a bit late in posting this (actually very late). But I thought some might be interested in reading my recent book review of Eugene Merrill’s commentary on 1–2 Chronicles that was published in the latest Themelios journal. Especially helpful are discussions on three theological themes in a redemptive-historical framework that are central to the … Continue reading A Book Review on Eugene Merrill’s 1–2 Chronicles Commentary

Earthy Signs of Israel’s Restoration

At the end of Hosea, God promises to restore Israel, and he declares his redemptive purposes using the earthy symbols of grain and vine: They shall return and dwell beneath my shadow;     they shall flourish like the grain; they shall blossom like the vine;     their fame shall be like the wine of Lebanon (Hos. 14:7). … Continue reading Earthy Signs of Israel’s Restoration

Scripture and Hermeneutics Seminar 2015

As ETS/SBL/AAR/etc approaches, I want to invite those interested to this year's Scripture and Hermeneutics Seminar and to the newly formed Scripture and Doctrine Seminar. The theme for the former is The Old Testament and Worldview, and Al Wolters, Raymond van Leeuwen, Koert van Bekkum, Jamie Grant, David Beldman, and I will be speaking on … Continue reading Scripture and Hermeneutics Seminar 2015

The Silliness of (Some) Source Criticism

My current course load includes one class on the Former Prophets, and this week we've dealt with the critical theories about these books' composition. Of course for Joshua-Kings the prevailing scholarly consensus is the "Deuteronomistic (or Deuteronomic) History," most famously postulated  by Martin Noth but having undergone many subsequent revisions. For Noth and most OT … Continue reading The Silliness of (Some) Source Criticism

Scripture and Hermeneutics Seminar 2015

The Scripture and Hermeneutics Seminar, which has produced the 8-volume Scripture and Hermeneutics Series with Zondervan, as well the upcoming Manifesto for Theological Interpretation with Baker, will host its annual meeting this year in Atlanta, GA (in partnership with IBR) on the topic of Worldview and the Old Testament. Speakers include Al Wolters, Jamie Grant, … Continue reading Scripture and Hermeneutics Seminar 2015

Quote of the Day

Right now I'm doing some research on the nature of wisdom in Solomon's judgment over the case of the two women claiming the same baby. I came across this great quote from Richard Briggs: Complaints against the supposition that this is a paradigm of wise judgment have come thick and fast from various quarters, including the rabbis, … Continue reading Quote of the Day