Racism Is Hell on Earth

The recent scenes in Charlottesville, Shelbyville, and my hometown of Murfreesboro were examples of real-life, in-your-face hell on earth. As white supremacists marched down the streets with Confederate and Nazi flags, screaming racial slurs and hailing Hitler, we saw the antithesis of heaven’s demography: You are worthy to take the scroll and to open its … Continue reading Racism Is Hell on Earth

Advertisements

Wesley Hill on Paul, the Trinity, and Theological Method

I interviewed Wesley Hill awhile back about his fantastic book, Paul and the Trinity. Hill's book is one of the best books I have read in years, and was the catalyst for my current Ph.D. dissertation. I posted it on my old blog, and am reposting the interview here because I think the Biblical Reasoning crowd … Continue reading Wesley Hill on Paul, the Trinity, and Theological Method

Basics for Interpreting the Book of Revelation

I didn’t grow up a Christian, but as soon as I began following Christ and attending a local church, I was almost immediately introduced to the Book of Revelation via the movie Left Behind. Like most Southern Baptist churches in the 90s, we talked a lot about the rapture, the Antichrist, the Tribulation, and miscellaneous … Continue reading Basics for Interpreting the Book of Revelation

Saul and the Restoration of Israel

In the Old Testament, Israel becomes divided long before the United Monarchy splits. At the end of Judges (chs. 19-21), a Levite takes a Judahite concubine and spends the night with her in Gibeah, a city which belonged to Benjamin. In a horrifying echo of Sodom and Gomorrah, the men of Benjamin come to rape … Continue reading Saul and the Restoration of Israel

The Four Gospels and the Rule of Faith

Steve Walton has helpfully summarized Simon Gathercole's plenary address to the British New Testament Society here. Walton's entire summary is worth reading, and I can only imagine how beneficial Gathercole's actual paper is. Gathercole cleverly draws our attention to 1 Cor. 15:3-4, a text that many refer to as the first "rule of faith," to … Continue reading The Four Gospels and the Rule of Faith

Baptist Theological Method

Over the last day or so I've read Richard Barcellos' The Lord's Supper as a Means of Grace: More Than a Memory (Fearn: Mentor, 2013). I highly recommend this short but pastoral, exegetically based, and historically informed study of the church's communion practice from a Baptist perspective. Although I could highlight a number of quotes … Continue reading Baptist Theological Method

Intertextuality in Revelation

Today on Twitter (and by today I mean 2 minutes ago) I mentioned that I think there is much work to be done on intertextuality between Revelation and the rest of the New Testament. Because of John's obvious reliance on the Old Testament, there have been an increasing number of articles and books published on … Continue reading Intertextuality in Revelation

Christ and the New Creation Kindle Edition

I just received word from Wipf and Stock that my book is now available in Kindle format. I neglected to change my Greek fonts when it was published in print, which is why there's been a delay with the electronic format. Thankfully I had some time to comb through it last week and get the … Continue reading Christ and the New Creation Kindle Edition

The Thorny Issue of Historical Background Research

I just sent in a review of David DeSilva's recent book, The Letter to the Hebrews in Social Scientific Perspective (Cascade Companions; Eugene, OR: Cascade, 2012). As the title indicates, it is a social scientific study of Hebrews. In the review I articulated my concern with some fundamental assumptions with this approach to biblical studies, … Continue reading The Thorny Issue of Historical Background Research