Arguing from Silence in the Early Church

This summer Luke Stamps and I had a relatively brief interaction about penal substitution and its catholicity. One of the common objections to penal substitution is that it is not found in the early church’s theological reflection. While we gave some brief examples in our posts of where it might be found, at least implicitly, … Continue reading Arguing from Silence in the Early Church

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Typology

Southern’s journal is nice that they have a theme. And theme of their recent journal is typology Wellum’s opening remarks notes that Christian’s disagree about how to understand typology But he gives his own definition of typology and the contours that he thinks all the contributors are working with in. My question is whether typology is only a Christological reading? His definition seems to imply this. So my question is how it relates to narrative patterning.

Theological Moorings for Canonical Readings

My doctoral supervisor, David Hogg, was once asked in my Theological Method PhD seminar what his method is. I still love his response: "I look for patterns and weird stuff." That is, his approach to reading Scripture consists largely of paying attention to what is repeated and what stands out as extraordinary, either in terms … Continue reading Theological Moorings for Canonical Readings

Earthy Signs of Israel’s Restoration

At the end of Hosea, God promises to restore Israel, and he declares his redemptive purposes using the earthy symbols of grain and vine: They shall return and dwell beneath my shadow;     they shall flourish like the grain; they shall blossom like the vine;     their fame shall be like the wine of Lebanon (Hos. 14:7). … Continue reading Earthy Signs of Israel’s Restoration

John Sailhamer: In Memoriam

I learned on Twitter earlier that John Sailhamer has passed away.  Due to his failing health over the last decade, his last major project - The Meaning of the Pentateuch - was published way back in 2009. In our consumer-driven, what-have-you-done-for-me-lately American culture, that may as well have been a century ago. But Sailhamer's influence … Continue reading John Sailhamer: In Memoriam

Gregory of Nyssa and a “Community of Wills”?

In Against Eunomius I.1.34 (NPNF 5), Gregory says this regarding the Father and Son sharing in one nature: So also the Father and Son are one, the community of nature and the community of will running, in them, into one. But if the Son had been joined in wish only to the Father, and divided … Continue reading Gregory of Nyssa and a “Community of Wills”?

Is There an Application in this Text?

No. Or at least, if what we mean by "application" is "something practical," then the answer is often, "no, not immediately so." I was listening to the radio this morning and there was an ad for some kind of art foundation. The tag line was "art works." No it doesn't. Art isn't supposed to "work." … Continue reading Is There an Application in this Text?

Historical Theology and Biblical Evidence in the Trinity Debate

I don't intend for this post to be long, just want to make a quick point about the relationship between historical theology and biblical evidence when we talk about the differing views of the Trinity. I've seen some comments on social media and blogs that go something like this: "While I can appreciate historical points … Continue reading Historical Theology and Biblical Evidence in the Trinity Debate

What Makes a Doctrine “Biblical”? On Method

I know some grow weary of debating the doctrine of the Trinity, and I understand that frustration. Social media and the blogosphere are not the best platforms to sort out a doctrinal debate as significant as our understanding of the Trinity. I do not intend here or in future posts to continue "debating" with anyone; … Continue reading What Makes a Doctrine “Biblical”? On Method

Baptist Theological Method

Over the last day or so I've read Richard Barcellos' The Lord's Supper as a Means of Grace: More Than a Memory (Fearn: Mentor, 2013). I highly recommend this short but pastoral, exegetically based, and historically informed study of the church's communion practice from a Baptist perspective. Although I could highlight a number of quotes … Continue reading Baptist Theological Method