Responding to Critiques of Inerrancy

In Can We Still Believe the Bible?, Craig Blomberg offers some observations on critiques of inerrancy and the idea that inerrancy “dies the death of a thousand qualifications” (pp. 126-130). He first employs Paul Feinberg’s definition: “Inerrancy means that when all facts are known, the Scriptures in their original autographs and properly interpreted will be … Continue reading Responding to Critiques of Inerrancy

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Are Evangelicals Too Soft on Modern-Day Heterodoxy?

Andy Stanley’s Marcion-like (or maybe hyper-dispensational?) view of the OT has resurfaced and the outcry has already been well worn. This is nothing new for Stanley—it has been a trend of his for years (and years). However, I don’t want to address him specifically here. The defense of his teachings from some corners of evangelicalism … Continue reading Are Evangelicals Too Soft on Modern-Day Heterodoxy?

The Trinity Debate (2016-2017): A Selected Bibliography

The 2016-2017 Trinity debate over the eternal submission of the Son was covered thoroughly by this blog, other blogs, Christianity Today, podcasts, a panel at ETS, and most certainly in every theological group text in evangelicalism. In an attempt to try and boil the debate down for those who want to read up, reflect, or … Continue reading The Trinity Debate (2016-2017): A Selected Bibliography

John the Seer vs. Caesar

While compiling notes for my dissertation on the Book of Revelation, I came across this note on Revelation 1:16 in Craig Koester’s Revelation commentary: The section climaxes by noting that [Jesus] holds seven stars in his right hand (Rev 1:16). This cosmic imagery conveys sovereignty. An analogy appears on a coin from Domitian’s reign that depicts … Continue reading John the Seer vs. Caesar

The Holy Spirit as Love and Gift

In his fantastic new book, Engaging the Doctrine of the Holy Spirit, Matthew Levering argues that "the Holy Spirit should be praised and contemplated under proper names 'Love' and 'Gift,' with respect both to his intra-trinitarian identity and to his historical work in Jesus Christ and the church" (2). This idea is nothing new, as Levering … Continue reading The Holy Spirit as Love and Gift

Early Christian Interpretation and Classical Christian Theism

I don't think it's an overstatement to say that there were quite a few major movements in twentieth century theology, from a variety of theological streams, that concerned themselves with overturning or significantly revising classical Christian theism (CCT). Influences as varied as biblical theology, apologetics, philosophy, church history, and the history of interpretation have contributed … Continue reading Early Christian Interpretation and Classical Christian Theism

Stages of Development in Early Trinitarian Theology

The first chapter of my dissertation deals with the usefulness of Revelation for Trinitarian theology, with some of the major Church Fathers as part of my justification. So, over the past few weeks, I've been reading the early church's use of the Book of Revelation in their discussions on the divinity of the Father, Son, and … Continue reading Stages of Development in Early Trinitarian Theology

Arguing from Silence in the Early Church

This summer Luke Stamps and I had a relatively brief interaction about penal substitution and its catholicity. One of the common objections to penal substitution is that it is not found in the early church’s theological reflection. While we gave some brief examples in our posts of where it might be found, at least implicitly, … Continue reading Arguing from Silence in the Early Church

Typology

Southern’s journal is nice that they have a theme. And theme of their recent journal is typology Wellum’s opening remarks notes that Christian’s disagree about how to understand typology But he gives his own definition of typology and the contours that he thinks all the contributors are working with in. My question is whether typology is only a Christological reading? His definition seems to imply this. So my question is how it relates to narrative patterning.

Theological Moorings for Canonical Readings

My doctoral supervisor, David Hogg, was once asked in my Theological Method PhD seminar what his method is. I still love his response: "I look for patterns and weird stuff." That is, his approach to reading Scripture consists largely of paying attention to what is repeated and what stands out as extraordinary, either in terms … Continue reading Theological Moorings for Canonical Readings