My 5 Favorite Books of 2017​

It's become a somewhat annual tradition for me and many others to write a post like this. But people love books lists as they consider last-second Christmas gifts or are looking for ways to spend their Amazon gift cards. There are a few reasons why I’ve compiled this list. First, I love reading and I … Continue reading My 5 Favorite Books of 2017​

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Basics for Interpreting the Book of Revelation

I didn’t grow up a Christian, but as soon as I began following Christ and attending a local church, I was almost immediately introduced to the Book of Revelation via the movie Left Behind. Like most Southern Baptist churches in the 90s, we talked a lot about the rapture, the Antichrist, the Tribulation, and miscellaneous … Continue reading Basics for Interpreting the Book of Revelation

Who Is My Neighbor?

Yesterday a comment on the Internet[1] sparked some reflection about the nature of neighbor-hood and the people who inhabit the Middle East. The comment in question seemed to conflate America, and particularly its Christian inhabitants, with an idealized version of Israel on the one hand, and Middle Eastern peoples, particularly devout Muslims, with Israel’s OT … Continue reading Who Is My Neighbor?

Book Review: Andrew Streett’s The Vine and the Son of Man

During ETS and SBL this year I was able to read through Andrew Streett's welcome contribution to Fortress Press' "Emerging Scholars" series, The Vine and the Son of Man: Eschatological Interpretation of Psalm 80 in Early Judaism. Streett, Assistant Professor of New Testament at Redeemer Seminary in Texas, revised his dissertation (Univ. of Wales Trinity … Continue reading Book Review: Andrew Streett’s The Vine and the Son of Man

Adolf Schlatter on Theological Method

I stumbled across an essay on the theological method of Adolf Schlatter that is instructive to the theological task. One of Schlatter's overarching points is the need for interpreters to take the proper time to actually observe what is in the text.  Here is one golden quote from Schlatter: We will continue to see exegetical works appear that show … Continue reading Adolf Schlatter on Theological Method

The Silliness of (Some) Source Criticism

My current course load includes one class on the Former Prophets, and this week we've dealt with the critical theories about these books' composition. Of course for Joshua-Kings the prevailing scholarly consensus is the "Deuteronomistic (or Deuteronomic) History," most famously postulated  by Martin Noth but having undergone many subsequent revisions. For Noth and most OT … Continue reading The Silliness of (Some) Source Criticism

The Pure and Undefiled Religion of Critical Biblical Scholarship

UPDATE: After reflecting on the fact that this discussion occurred on a Facebook thread, I've removed direct quotes. It's also been brought to my attention that to include quotes from a private Facebook thread is not allowed by their privacy policy. Please know that their inclusion in the original post was to illustrate the nature … Continue reading The Pure and Undefiled Religion of Critical Biblical Scholarship

Jason Hood on Michael Bird (Luke Wisley)

At the beginning of June, Jason Hood posted some reflections on what he learned from Michael Bird as his doctoral supervisor. Jason's post really resonated with me, so I thought I would repost two of his thoughts with my own reflections. * MASTER your content; being a GENERALIST, a category I learned about from Michael and something to which I … Continue reading Jason Hood on Michael Bird (Luke Wisley)

An Observation About Biblical Studies

It is fascinating to me that many biblical scholars today deride their discipline's captivity to modernity and modernity's methods while they at the same time continue to accept conclusions about the biblical text that are clearly tied to a modernistic approach. I've recently read articles and monographs by TIS proponents, biblical scholars approaching their topic … Continue reading An Observation About Biblical Studies